Oases

An oasis generally forms where a water table is closer to the earth’s surface so that the water that can let life develop comes to the surface. Occasionally, oases are artificially made by digging wells, even to a depth of a few kilometres, to reach the water table from which water can be taken later with a pump or bucket.
The vegetation of these habitats generally consists of date palms and small vegetable, fruit and cereal plantations. They need water, which is channelled and brought to the vegetable gardens of the oasis. Oases need man to take care of it, since it risks disappearing buried in the sand that slowly settles on them during sandstorms. Protective belts have been put in place at present, even if only in the richest areas, while elsewhere the oases are protected by barriers made of palm branches.

Special reports

From the Multimedia section

  • ecosystems

    Oases

    Look

    ecosystems

    Welwitschia

    Look

    ecosystems

    Desert plants

    Look
  • ecosystems

    Desert animals

    Look

    ecosystems

    Sandy desert

    Look

    ecosystems

    Kolmanskop

    Look
  • ecosystems

    The history of the desert

    Look

    ecosystems

    Camel

    Look

    ecosystems

    Lithops: cactus desert

    Look

Facts