“Frozen” Thames

Since there has been a continuous alternation of very cold periods and very hot periods in the past, some believe that the current variations in temperature are quite natural and negligible. In this way the importance of climate changes is minimized and  it is “convenient” to believe that this is an invention of the media. As proof of a past that was much colder than today, the frozen Thames is often mentioned. The Thames, in fact, used to freeze often during the cold season, but this has not occurred since the winter of 1814.  It is true that the temperatures have changed, but there have been other very cold winters as the one of 1963, the coldest of the 20th Century, when even lake Constance froze. Actually there are other reasons for the Thames not freezing anymore. In 1831, the London Bridge was built again with wider arches and without a dam to control the tides which therefore flow further upstream, and this prevents the water freezing in winter. In fact the frozen Thames would block the entire port, and also all the commercial activities.  Furthermore the increase in civil and industrial waste discharged in this river increases the water temperature, which also prevents the formation of ice.

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